A.W. Frank, Letting Stories Breath: A Socio-narratology. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 2010. Stories accompany us through life from birth to death. But they do not merely entertain, inform, or distress us—they show us what counts as right or wrong and teach us who we are and who we can imagine being. Stories connect people, but they can also disconnect, creating boundaries between people and justifying violence. In Letting Stories Breathe, Arthur W. Frank grapples with this fundamental aspect of our lives, offering both a theory of how stories shape us and a useful method for analyzing them. Along the way he also tells stories: from folktales to research interviews to remembrances.

A.W. Frank, Letting Stories Breath: A Socio-narratology. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 2010.

Stories accompany us through life from birth to death. But they do not merely entertain, inform, or distress us—they show us what counts as right or wrong and teach us who we are and who we can imagine being. Stories connect people, but they can also disconnect, creating boundaries between people and justifying violence. In Letting Stories Breathe, Arthur W. Frank grapples with this fundamental aspect of our lives, offering both a theory of how stories shape us and a useful method for analyzing them. Along the way he also tells stories: from folktales to research interviews to remembrances.


A.W. Frank, The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine, and How to Live. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2004. This book expands the scope from illness experience to include stories of physicians and nurses. Generosity is presented as an antidote to demoralization in both the receiving and giving of medical care. Setting personal stories with a framework including multiple philosophers, the book shows the possibility of generosity and its moral importance.

A.W. Frank, The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine, and How to Live. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2004.

This book expands the scope from illness experience to include stories of physicians and nurses. Generosity is presented as an antidote to demoralization in both the receiving and giving of medical care. Setting personal stories with a framework including multiple philosophers, the book shows the possibility of generosity and its moral importance.


 A.W. Frank, The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1995. This book remains one of the most cited works on illness experience and narrative ethics; it has been translated into Japanese. It has been anthologized in several of the best-selling medical sociology texts, including those edited by Peter Conrad and Kathy Charmaz. The framework of the restitution, chaos, and quest narratives of illness has been used in numerous articles and books and become part of the vocabulary of medical sociology and humanities in medicine.

 A.W. Frank, The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1995.

This book remains one of the most cited works on illness experience and narrative ethics; it has been translated into Japanese. It has been anthologized in several of the best-selling medical sociology texts, including those edited by Peter Conrad and Kathy Charmaz. The framework of the restitution, chaos, and quest narratives of illness has been used in numerous articles and books and become part of the vocabulary of medical sociology and humanities in medicine.


A. W. Frank, At the Will of the Body: Reflections on Illness. Boston: Houghton Mifflin: 1991. New 2002 edition with an Afterword. The winner of the 1996 Writers’ Award from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (Washington, D.C.), this book has been translated in four languages and anthologized in multiple scholarly and trade anthologies on medical sociology and illness experience. The concept of “the remission society” is frequently cited.

A. W. Frank, At the Will of the Body: Reflections on Illness. Boston: Houghton Mifflin: 1991. New 2002 edition with an Afterword.

The winner of the 1996 Writers’ Award from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (Washington, D.C.), this book has been translated in four languages and anthologized in multiple scholarly and trade anthologies on medical sociology and illness experience. The concept of “the remission society” is frequently cited.